Memorable First Lines in a Book

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The first lines in a book doesn’t necessarily make that book a great read but it can instantly pique your interest or make you close that book and move on.

I listed here (this is in no particular order) some of the most memorable first lines I have ever read.

1. Dark Fever by Karen Marie Moning

My philosophy is pretty simple – any day nobody’s trying to kill me is a good day in my book.

I haven’t had many good days lately.

2. I Am The Messenger by Markus Zusak

The gunman is useless.

I know it.

He knows it.

The whole bank knows it.

3. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.

4. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks

I am nothing special, of this I am sure. I am a common man with common thoughts and I’ve led a common life. There are no monuments dedicated to me and my name will soon be forgotten, but I’ve loved another with all my heart and soul, and to me, this has always been enough.

5. Hounded by Kevin Hearne

There are many perks to living for twenty-one centuries, and foremost among them is bearing witness to the rare birth of genius. It invariably goes like this: Someone shrugs off the weight of his cultural traditions, ignores the baleful stares of authority, and does something his countrymen think to be completely batshit insane. Of those, Galileo was my personal favorite. Van Gogh comes in second, but he really was batshit insane.

What’s your favorite first line?  Please share it in the comment.

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4 thoughts on “Memorable First Lines in a Book

  1. Good list! I think one of my favorite if not opening lines but openings in general (a single-page prologue) is that of Patrick Rothfuss’ ‘Name of the Wind’.

    “It was night again. The Waystone Inn lay in silence, and it was a silence of three parts.”

    Liked by 1 person

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